DMZ 3D Scouting Process

DMZ 3D Scouting Process

When using our Ag UAV Scouting units we utilize the 3D Scouting Process developed by DMZ Aerial. The three D's stand for Discovery, Diagnosis, and Documentation and through this process we effectively scout crops from the air. Below you will find how the 3D scouting process works.

Discovery

The discovery phase of the three step process is where our Ag UAV will provide its most valuable information. Providing a bird's-eye-view at 100-400 feet, our drone will help identify problem areas in a field. Discoloration and crop damage are the main features we will be identifying with our HD cameras and from these aerial images, issues involving plant diseases, nutrient deficiencies, crop damage, and insect pressure will come to light. With various camera modifications additional light spectrum images can also be captured during the discovery phase. In addition to problem areas, the discovery phase of our process is a great way to capture the differences in side-by-side trials as well.
Discovery
Diagnosis

Diagnosis

At the culmination of the discovery phase a closer look may be needed. If any of the problem areas are within range, a user may want to fly our unit in for a closer look. A user can fly our UAV as close as they feel comfortable to any plants or weeds they are curious about. From this closer look a person may be able to develop a diagnosis and associated cure. Our HD cameras shoot video imagery as well as still photos. These stills are approximately 4000X3000 pixels which allows them to be zoomed in on. Due to this, a user can shoot a photo from a few feet over the canopy and then zoom in on it when they put the SD card in their computer, phone, or tablet. Zooming into only 25% of the photo still shows HD imagery (approx. 1080p). This means you can get right in on the leaf tissue and potentially make disease diagnosis's or even insect identification of larger insects like Japanese beetles. However, if a diagnosis cannot be determined based on the video, further, in-person scouting will likely be required. Nonetheless, after discovery and diagnosis, a crop scout will have some direction when deciding where to walk.

Documentation

The last step in our process is maybe the most valuable for a prospective retailer or consultant. Farmers appreciate being looked after by their retailers. A simple note on their door letting them know their field has been scouted can strengthen the relationship between the retailer and the farmer. As crop scouts we have seen this appreciation from farmers. If a note can help build relationships, imagine what an aerial video could do. Communicating with a farmer throughout seasons by showing them aerial videos can help strengthen their trust in you. Additionally, this video can serve as documentation that the field was scouted and in some cases serve as evidence of spraying for example. Plus, video evidence will help convince farmers you are truly looking out for them. Plus this footage can be used in the offseason during winter meetings with growers.
Documentation