Commercial UAV Compliance

Commercial UAV Compliance

In order to be in full compliance with the FAA's new regulatory framework, Remote Pilots of UAV Aircraft, who use their aircraft for commercial purposes, must be properly licensed and registered. Prior to the FAA's new regulatory framework, which they announced in the Summer of 2016, there were questions as to the legality of most of the commercial UAV Flights in the United States due to the FAA's effective ban on commercial UAV Flights in 2007. However, the FAA did introduce a quasi-licensing procedure in 2015 when they introduced Section 333 Exemptions, which were really company or personal exemptions pertaining to flight rules under 14 CFR and not true "Commercial UAV Licenses." These exemptions were very rigid, meaning they did not give pilots much leeway in terms of operations. UAV Pilots had to be actual licensed pilots under Part 61, they had to utilize a Visual Observer, etc. With the introduction of Part 107, a lot has changed. To learn more about Part 107 and how to obtain your Remote Pilot Certificate, please click on the picture or the link below!

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Remote Pilot Certificate

Under Part 107, all commercial UAV Pilots operating within the United States (unless they have a previously-granted Section 333 Exemption - which is valid for 2 years after its approval) must possess a Remote Pilot Certificate, which is kind of like a commercial drone pilot's license. This Pilot Certificate is recognized by the FAA and due to that you must apply for it using the FAA's application portal, and pass a written aeronautical knowledge test which covers various aspects of aviation, including; Airspace Classifications, Weather Phenomena, Airport Operations, etc. To gain free access to our detailed information on obtaining a Remote Pilot Certificate, please click on the picture or on the link below.

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Remote Pilot Certificate
Aircraft Registration

Aircraft Registration

In addition to holding a Remote Pilot Certificate, remote pilots must also obtain proper aircraft registration. To do this, users can apply for a registration number on the FAA's online registration portal. The cost for registering an aircraft is $5.00. Additionally, once a pilot has received a registration number, they must affix that number to their aircraft in a place that is viewable or accessible without the use of tools. Also, this registration number must be legible. To be taken to the online registration portal, please click on the picture or on the link below.

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Part 107 Rules

After obtaining a Remote Pilot Certificate and registering an aircraft, pilots must then follow all laws pertaining to UAVs and airspace in general. This means following the new Part 107 Rules, which are modeled after the early safety guidelines that governed the industry over the past several years. In general, a highlight of the rules would be, operators must fly below 400 feet AGL, within visual line of sight, not over people, and during daytime flying hours. There are many more rules contained in Part 107, but this is a basic overview. The learn more about all the Part 107 Rules and to prepare yourself for the FAA Aeronautical Knowledge Test, please click on the picture or on the link below to be taken to our Part 107 Study Curriculum.

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Part 107 Rules